Nadel & Ciarlo, P.C.

How to break a lease if you’re taking a new job

Imagine this situation: You need to break your lease because you have taken a job in another state.

As excited as you may be about your move, it goes without saying that you're concerned about the process of breaking your lease.

As a tenant, you have an obligation to live up to the terms and conditions set forth in your lease agreement. For this reason, it's not always simple to break your lease and move on. However, there are several steps you can take to make your life easier:

-- Negotiate with the landlord. This is one of the best steps you can take, as it puts you in position to save money while getting out of your lease once and for all. For example, you may be able to negotiate a lease buyout. With a one time payment, you can break your lease and move on.

-- Find a new tenant. Did you know that you have the right to find a replacement tenant? This does not mean that the landlord has to rent the property to the person, but he or she could face additional challenges in the future by turning down a qualified renter.

Taking a new job in another state is a big move. For many people, this means they will have to break their lease. If you find yourself in this position, it's a good idea to know your legal rights and the steps you can take to work something out with the landlord.

By making a few key decisions, you can avoid a serious dispute with your landlord.

Source: FindLaw, "Breaking a Lease to Take a Job," accessed April 18, 2017

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